Experts Trust These Supplements; Recommend them to Everyone








Wondering what your health care provider takes to stay well?  Is it a prescription?  Probably your health care experts trusts – and takes one of the same supplements that they recommend to you.  So, here’s what they are, and why you should be taking them:

Probiotics are one of the many supplements that health care professionals take to stay well.

Probiotics are one of the many supplements that health care professionals take to stay well.

When they want to fight pain and inflammation

You might not know it, but your doctor is likely aging, just like you.  Maybe it’s that old sports injury, or maybe they just want to keep their joints healthy and long lasting.  Whatever the reason, chances are that your doctor is using these:

-          Capsaicin.  This compound comes from hot peppers, and it can help to soothe your sore muscles.  First it stimulates, then it decreases the pain signals.

-          Omega-3 Fatty Acids.  You can find this in flaxseed and fish oils, and it helps to soothe pain and inflammation of all parts of the body.

Be careful though, because omega-3 works to thin the blood, so if you’re already taking warfarin or a daily aspirin, you should avoid taking this supplement.

When they want to boost the mood

Even the doc has days that he or she feels a bit down, tired and sluggish.  That’s why they choose these supplements to help them stay alert, chipper and keep that general pep in their step:

-          Ginseng.  You can find it as the Asian, Siberian or American varieties, but any type of ginseng is said to have properties that help to stimulate the adrenal hormone known as ACTH.  It helps to boost physical performance and alertness.  The best products to look for contain four to five percent ginsenosides.

Be careful though, because you shouldn’t use ginseng if you’ve been taking the blood thinner called warfarin or antibiotics.

-          Guarana.  This is a Brazilian shrub that helps to boost alertness, memory and mood.

Be careful because guarana contains caffeine, so you should not use it if you have a heart condition or high blood pressure.

When they want to boost their immunity

Health care professionals get sick, too, so they like to do all they can to make sure that they have the most protection they can.  It’s not masks, or immunizations that keep these professionals going strong; it’s supplements like these:

-          Andrographis.  This is an Asian plant, and it’s used for it’s cold busting properties.  It can prevent colds, or if you already have one, it can help to ease their symptoms.

-          Probiotics.  It’s found in all kinds of things, dairy products, pills, and even added to drinks, but the point is it’s good for you.  According to a Swedish study, when employees were given “good” bacteria supplements daily, they missed less work due to illness than those that received none.

When they want to stay, well, regular

Yes, even health care professionals deal with the occasional stomach problems and irregularity.  That’s why they take these supplements:

-          Ginger.  Ginger root can help to ease upset stomach and ease indigestion and gas.

Psyllium Husks.  When taken with no less than eight ounces of water or juice, Psyllium helps with the absorption of food.  It works to prevent constipation by soaking up the liquid in intestines, which can help to make it easier to go – well, you know.

Powered By DT Author Box

Written by Melissa Krosby

Melissa Krosby currently lives in Gainesville, Florida and has a myriad of experience in writing expos and articles on various niches. As an expert journalist she started her career in High School as the newspaper and yearbook director. Throughout her career her work has been published in thousands of well-known media outlets.However, she finds the best source for her expanding her skills is that of experience, in depth research, and relating to what readers like. Melissa is savvy with fitness, health, and diet articles as you will find she definitely has a way with words and keeping the readers interest. Contact Melissa at Melissa@newhealthalert.net.

Pin It

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

You may use these HTML tags and attributes: <a href="" title=""> <abbr title=""> <acronym title=""> <b> <blockquote cite=""> <cite> <code> <del datetime=""> <em> <i> <q cite=""> <strike> <strong>