Study: One Fizzy Drink Daily Increases Risk Of Kidney Stones by 25 Percent








A recent study has found that drinking one fizzy drink per can increase the risk of developing kidney stones by a whopping 25 percent.  The study found that consuming sugar sweetened drinks can cause these stones to develop.

 

A recent study found that those who drink one or more fizzy, sugary drink per day are 25 percent more likely to develop kidney stones.

A recent study found that those who drink one or more fizzy, sugary drink per day are 25 percent more likely to develop kidney stones.

Kidney stones are small deposits of acid and mineral salts that develop in the kidney.  There are many different causes, and they can affect any part of the urinary tract including the bladder and kidneys.  Most of the time, the stones develop where urine is concentrated as they crystallize and stick together.  While passing a stone is extremely painful, they usually leave no permanent damage to the body, and most of the time, the only thing necessary to help them pass is lots of water and pain medication.

According to Dr. Gary Curhan, author of study, “Our study found that the relation between fluid intake and kidney stones may be dependent on the type of beverage consumed.  We found that higher consumption of sugar-sweetened drinks was associated with a higher incidence of kidney stones.”

In fact, research done by Brigham and Women’s Hospital in Boston found that other drinks, including orange juice, tea and coffee actually lowered the risk of developing kidney stones.

According to Nbcnews.com in an article published in May of 2012, kidney stone rates have doubled in a period of 16 years.  In 1994, , an estimated one in 20 people suffered from kidney stones, but by the years between 2007 and 2011, that rate had climbed to one in 11 people with kidney stones.

Part of the reason for the increase likely has to do with diets that are higher in fat and sugar, and those that have health problems such as diabetes, gout and obesity are more likely to develop kidney stones than those that are healthy.  The new information from this most recent study also helps to clear the blurry lines as to what beverages might be better avoided in those that are at risk for stones.

For the study, 194,095 were followed over the course of eight years.  The researchers found that those that drank at least one cola that was sweetened with sugar daily had a 23 percent higher chance of kidney stones when compared with participants who drank less than one serving of sugary cola drinks a week.  However, the study found that the increase was also found in those that consumed non-cola sugar sweetened drinks.

According to the co-author of the study, Dr. Pietro Manuel Ferroro, of the Catholic University of the Sacred Heart in Rome, the study shows that certain beverages are actually linked to a decrease in the chances for developing kidney stones.  He also said that those who tend to drink more fluids in general are less likely to develop stones, the information regarding what beverages are beneficial to drink may be helpful for health care providers that are interested in helping their patients to reduce the chances for developing kidney stones.

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Written by Melissa Krosby

Melissa Krosby currently lives in Gainesville, Florida and has a myriad of experience in writing expos and articles on various niches. As an expert journalist she started her career in High School as the newspaper and yearbook director. Throughout her career her work has been published in thousands of well-known media outlets.However, she finds the best source for her expanding her skills is that of experience, in depth research, and relating to what readers like. Melissa is savvy with fitness, health, and diet articles as you will find she definitely has a way with words and keeping the readers interest. Contact Melissa at Melissa@newhealthalert.net.

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